ColumbiaDC | Alexander Hamilton and the City

Washington, DC
The Rise, Fall, and Rise Again of New York | Professor Kenneth T. Jackson 6pm: Social 7pm: Family-Style Dinner 8pm: Lecture June, 1790. Welcome to New York, a rapidly growing seaport of 28,000 people at the tip of Manhattan. Its crude infrastructure: narrow, crooked unpaved streets often unlit and frequently made impassable by wandering pigs, contrasts sharply with its importance as the site of Washington's 1789 inaugural and seat of the first Congress. Alexander Hamilton is about to dine with James Madison and Thomas Jefferson at Jefferson's Maiden Lane Home ("The Room Where It Happens"). Their support is critical to Hamilton's goal of establishing the foundation for public credit: creating a Central Bank, assuming the states' debts and making New York the permanent capital of the new nation. Why New York? What was Hamilton's vision of its future and the role cities would play in the growth of the young country? How did New York become one of the world's most exciting cities: gateway to the US and a financial, commercial, intellectual and artistic center?